WonderBaba

Healthcare by a Pharmacist mum!


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A WonderBaba Review of Salt Therapy with Salins!

Why I wanted to review the Salin Air Purifier (Salt Therapy device)!

salt_cave

Salt therapy has been used for years in Eastern Europe and Russia where salt caverns are abundant.  People use salt caves for the treatment and prevention of respiratory conditions which is known as  ‘speleotherapy’.  Modern salt caves and rooms are being built more frequently and a quick google search show that they are becoming more and more popular in Ireland.  Halotherapy is the term used to describe the salt therapy in man made rooms.  This type of therapy is not cheap at around 20 euro for 45-60 minutes!

I found lots of research about salt therapy but actually the evidence does not always confirm with standard or recommended medical research and as a result I do feel it is important to say that there is a lack of robust scientific research on the use of salt therapy.  This is not necessary a reflection on its efficacy though, just more a note that further randomised controlled trials are needed before I could hand on heart say that this is evidence based medicine.  At the moment I cannot so I just want to make that clear from the onset!  However, the anecdotal evidence is outstanding and overwhelming and on both personal and professional levels I like to take a holistic approach to the treatment of illness.  Salt therapy is not likely to do any harm ( however use caution in severe asthmatics as with any new treatment!) so I personally felt that I wanted to give it a try it!  This is a product that does not contain drugs, it’s natural and it is also non-invasive.  It should ALWAYS be used IN ADDITION to prescribed medication and no changes should be made to treatment plans without a discussion with your childs GP.

Salt Therapy

salins plus infographicSalt therapy is thought to work through its mucolytic, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.  It is also a negatively charged ion.  The negatively charged ions make contact with the respiratory airways and stimulate ciliary mobility and the ability for mucous to flow through the membranes.  In addition to this the salt sits on the membranes and draws the mucous out by osmosis.  Now this is cool because a persistent chesty cough is often caused by mucus plugs.  In theory, this allows for clearer airways, improved removal of mucus from the chest and easier more free breathing.  There are many respiratory conditions which cause a mucus build up where this type of therapy may be beneficial such as asthma, bronchitis, infections, allergies, sinusitis, laryngitis and so on.

It’s no secret that I’m a little obsessed with the Vicks Warm Steam Vapouriser and I suppose the key reason for this is that it is so absolutely effective at loosening mucus and conditioning the airways.  This reduces inflammation and allows chesty coughs to be broken down allowing for easier breathing through the sinuses and lungs.  People always ask me if they should use it all of the time as a preventative measure and it’s so important to stress that no, the Vick Vapouriser product is only meant for use when your child actually has a cough or cold.  There’s a few reasons for this but on a practical level it just is not good for your walls to have 365 days of steam exposure! It doesn’t cause any problems when plugged in over night for a few nights when a child has a cold but even then I always recommend you to keep the bedroom door a foot open and make sure to open the windows wide for half an hour once everyone is dressed and up for the day!  Following these guidelines I have never once had a problem with damp with over five years of sporadic use for three children! Yes the walls are steamy in the morning – they are meant to be! But once the room is well aired afterwards there should be no issue.  I must say I absolutely love the Vicks Warm steam Vapouriser for cough or cold – and no I have not been paid to say that!!! It’s a quick fix providing almost instant relief for an irritating or chesty cough and has saved my sanity on several occasions over the last few years with the kids!

In any case I still had a problem, I wanted to find a product that is suitable for every day use.  I wanted to find a product that would help my own children and other WonderBabas to fight back against the common occurrence of coughs, colds and respiratory illnesses.

Salin-Plus.jpgThe product I discovered is the Salin Plus Air Purifier which is a Salt Therapy machine. This takes all of the benefits of treatment in a salt room and pops it into a convenient little device which can be used in your own home!  The benefits of visiting a salt therapy room or cave are relatively short term (and expensive!!) as you need constant exposure for constant relief which is why I love the convenience of this product.  It is suitable for children of all ages – and adults too of course!

How does it work?

This device works by providing all of the benefits of salt therapy by having air pushed through a filter by a little fan so the micro-crystalline salts create a fine constant spray in the surrounding area.  As a mum I always want to know the practical points and I can say that this machine is great in terms of sound – it’s very quiet and can be turned up or down using a simple dial on the back so that you can decide what level of sound your child will put up with!  On a low setting you really can’t hear it at all, so you could start it low as your little one is going to sleep but then ramp it up when they are asleep to benefit from the increased levels of salt in the room.  I was able to start it on a medium to high level before my two year old got curious!!

How you should use it?

When first starting off with this product it’s a good idea to have about a month of intensive use – basically have the machine plugged in at night and also in the rooms you are using during the day.  Obviously this is only possible when you’re at home so all you can do is your best!   Ideally it should be used for a minimum of eight hours per day so overnight seems like the easiest and most convenient time but because you can easily carry it around (I’m a weakling and seriously this thing is really light!) you can have it on in the living room during the day as well if you like.  It is suitable for use as an every day product and will do no damage to your walls. One device will treat a max area of 55 sq meters. I’m not great on spacial awareness but some people do place the product in the hall if the bedrooms are close by and have the doors open.  On another practical note it’s supposed to help with snoring so it is no harm to let everyone get the benefits….eh hem…yes i’m talking about you Mr WonderBaba….!!

How did my review go?

I tried this product out over almost four weeks.  I have no asthmatics in the house so can’t comment on that front personally – but there’s a kazillion positive asthma stories online!  I do have a little lady with constant tonsillitis who struggles with breathing at night and as a result snores a lot etc.  This definitely reduced her snoring and so I think it is a fair assumption that it improved the quality of her sleep.  My son has had a lingering cough and I tried the device in his room one night but to be honest the kids rooms are a shape where I couldn’t place the device between the rooms as the effect would have been lost so I chose to give it to my daughter who as I explained has more lingering breathing problems at night (not for long – good bye tonsils!!).  For my son I went back to my old reliable Vick warm steam vapouriser which I feel I will still whip out at any sign of the sniffles or cough as i feel it is more of an ‘instant fix’.  However from my personal experience with the improvement of my little ladies breathing I would be optimistic that the frequency of respiratory issues would be significantly reduced through the regular use of the Salin Plus Salt Therapy device.  I would hope that many coughs and colds would not have a chance to settle on their chests due to the improved respiratory function and thinner mucus.  It might seem like a leap of faith though but due to the astounding amount of anecdotal evidence it’s one that I have definitely been happy to make!  I don’t stock products I don’t believe in but I will stock the Salin Plus Salt Therapy Device.  Be warned though the machine is not cheap!! It retails at €160  and the replacement filters (need to be changed every 4-6 months) cost €50.  I think that if it improves absenteeism from creche or school (and thus a parent from work) that it’s probably quite a good investment.  Many people report a significant decrease in the number of antibiotics their child needed etc so that too is worth factoring in.  For me potentially non-invasive and natural prevention is a clear choice!

Available to Purchase Here!

salinThe Salin Plus Air Purifier is available on OFFER here over on my shop website!

salinplus_filters_small                                  You can Also buy the refills by clicking here!

cropped-cropped-feet1.pngI hope you found this information helpful and as always don’t hesitate to contact me on the WonderBaba Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) with any questions or for one to one advice for your little one! You can also consult with me in person at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 or over the phone on 012600262.

 

 

 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8266663?dopt=Abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10439712?dopt=Abstract

https://lungfoundation.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Salt-Therapy.pdf


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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome – also known as Cot Death.

I think any mum sitting down to write an article on this topic would feel the same – the first sentence and I can hardly breathe. I can’t possibly try to empathise with or understand how the horror of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) must make a family feel, it’s beyond the scope of my words and heavily beyond the strength of my heart. So I begin this article with a huge sorrow and sadness for those families already affected and also with a clear purpose of writing in the hope that together, as parents, we can ensure that our babies are exposed to as few risk factors as physically possible.

According to the HSE website SIDS can be defined as “the sudden unexpected death of an apparently well infant for which there is no explanation”.  They also say that “most babies die in their sleep peacefully”.

SIDS is not common – that is important to know – but from the most up to date information I could find it still claimed the lives of 34 babies in Ireland in 2004.  This is significantly reduced from 134 babies per year in the 1980s.  Babies are less affected when they start to gain mobility at about five months of age.  The MOST IMPORTANT thing to take away from this article is that reducing the risk factors for SIDS has reduced the amount of babies that have died.   So the advice you hear at every hospital appointment, GP or public health nurse visit is all trying to deliver the same message – if you follow the guidelines for SIDS risk reduction you reduce the risk of your baby being affected.

question markWhat do we know?

It is also important to appreciate that whilst some risk factors have been associated with SIDS the cause actually remains unknown.  Sometimes there are no answers to the questions SIDS must raise, even though I imagine answers are what you would actually need and be looking for.  With this in mind I think all we can do is the best with the information that we DO know.

We know that 9 out of 10 SIDS deaths occur when a baby is six months or younger.  We know that more baby boys than girls die from SIDS (1.5 : 1).  We know that premature and low birth weight babies have an increased risk of SIDS. We know that exposure to tobacco smoke can increase your babies risk of SIDS x 8! We know that smoking during pregnancy can increase your babies risk of SIDS x 4!  We know that sleeping with an adult increases the risk of SIDS and that this risk increases if the adult has consumed ANY alcohol or drugs which may cause drowsiness.  We know that putting a baby to sleep on their tummy or side increase the risk of SIDS.  We know that a baby using a duvet, quilt or pillow under one year of age is more at risk of SIDS.  Finally we know that a baby who is over heated through their clothes or environment is at increased risk of SIDS.  So actually we know a lot.

How do we use this info to reduce the risk of SIDS?

  • IMG_7589Place your baby on their back when putting them down for sleep.  If they roll onto their tummy with physical ability and by choice it’s ok but don’t place them to sleep on their tummy.  Their feet should be touching the foot of the cot.
  • Use thin blankets or sheets no higher than their shoulders and tuck them in so that they can’t slip over their heads.  Alternatively I found it easier to use baby sleeping bags. Always use the correct size sleeping bag for your baby as otherwise it may slip over their heads – if the small size of sleeping bag seems too big just use blankets for a few more weeks.
  • Do tummy time to help develop strength and muscle tone – you can read more about this in my flat head article by clicking here.
  • quit smoking wonderbabaEradicate all exposure of tobacco smoke to your baby – quit smoking if your can or if not ensure you smoke outside (another room in the house or out the window will not completely get rid of the smoke – you may not be able to smell or see it but it can linger for a couple of hours in a room.)  Don’t handle the baby or let another smoker soon after a cigarette.  For support to quit smoking check out this great website – www.quit.ie – loads of brilliant support and tips available!
  • Its been found that the lowest risk of SIDS is in babies who sleep in a cot or crib in the same room as their parents until they are six months of age.  I found a co-sleeper crib great as it meant I had a lot of the convenience of co-sleeping whilst breastfeeding and recovering from c-section but also the baby had the safety of their own space – in my room.
  • Whilst the evidence is not robust on this tip it’s still worth mentioning that soother use has been associated with a reduction in SIDS risk.  Obviously if your baby doesn’t take to a soother then there’s nothing you can do about it, but if your baby does like a soother at bed time then it’s no harm – and if it falls out when they’re asleep there is no need to put it back in unless they look for it 🙂  For lot’s of more information on soother use check out my full blog by clicking here!
  • Don’t use a duvet, quilt or pillow for your baby if they are under 12 months of age.
  • Keep the temperature of their bedroom between 16 and 20 degrees celcius – ideally 18!
  • Don’t place their cot, crib, or moses basket next to a radiator, heater, fire or in direct sunlight.
  • Babies regulate their heat a lot using their heads – so no hats in bed.
  • Use a firm clean mattress which fits the cot or basket well – with no gaps down the sides.

 

little handWhilst it’s important to be aware of the risk factors and reduce them where you can I think as parents we would find it hard to cope if you thought this was a common occurrence which was a big risk to your baby every day.  So using the most recent figure I could see of 34 Cot Deaths per year in 2004 and also looking at the stats for 2016 – it would mean that to the 34 babies who died there were 63,863 who did not.  We can’t always fear what might happen, if we are taking reasonable precautions to reduce risk factors and act as responsible parents I think we have to just believe that everything will be fine and enjoy our beautiful WonderBabas as they grow and develop into amazingly unique and perfect individuals with more wonder to reveal each day.

If you would like to learn more about SIDS or need support there are some great resources available in Ireland:

 

feetI hope you found this information helpful and as always don’t hesitate to contact me on the WonderBaba Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) with any questions or for one to one advice for your little one! You can also consult with me in person at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 or over the phone on 012600262


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WonderBaba Guide – Suppositories versus Oral Medicine?

Well this is an interesting one as there are a few different factors which need to be considered.  For the purposes of this article I am speaking about the use of suppositories to treat fever and pain, and not referring to their use in constipation.  For more information on constipation and how it can be treated effectively click here.

Untitled design (17)The first thing I have to say is that suppositories are not as scary as some people think, they are just cone-shaped boluses of medicine which can be easily given to your child to treat pain of fever when a liquid is not suitable.  Suppositories available to treat fever and pain include ones based on paracetamol such as Paralink and Tipol, and ones based on ibuprofen such as nurofen.  These are both suitable from three months of age – just make sure to read the packaging to get the correct dosing for your child.

Before I go into the detail of how you actually use suppositories I’m going to get straight to the point and tell you when you SHOULD  use suppositories.

  • Use them if your child has a high fever or is in pain and will not or cannot take oral medication.
  • Use them to treat fever or pain when your child has vomiting.
  • My mummy perspective suggests using them when you are travelling to avoid having to carry lots of liquids.. I suggest this only for young children who are quite happy to use a suppository over oral meds.

What are the pros and cons?

question markUsing suppositories is more invasive than using oral medicine so a correct approach and a respect for your child’s comfort is essential.  I will explain in the next section how to use them but now I just want to emphasise that when used properly with a willing child they are so simple, easy and convenient to use.  I personally feel that a child who is still in nappies is an ideal candidate for this method of giving medicine – they are used to you cleaning and touching their nappy area and so will not be distressed when you insert the suppository – in fact many children will not even notice!! I also think it is a different situation when a child is out of nappies and unless you have the child’s permission and general understanding of what is going to happen I think the oral route of medicine is best when possible.  Another factor to consider is that suppositories have been proven effective for the treatment of pain or fever but they may actually take a little longer to take effect than oral medicine.

When faced with a vomiting child with a high temperature that needs to come down, or a child with a jaw so tightly clenched and unwilling to take oral medicine it is definitely a good idea to have suppositories on stand by.

So how to you use them?

For this bit I’m going to cheat and provide you with a perfect explanation from the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital in London:

“Remember – suppositories should never be swallowed.

  • Sit your child on the toilet to see if they need a poo.
  • Wash your hands.
  • Warm the suppository in your hands for a minute.
  • Remove the foil or plastic wrapping.
  • Get your child into any of these positions to give the suppository:
    • squatting down
    • lying on one side with one leg straight and the other bent
    • standing up with one leg raised
  • Gently but firmly push the suppository into your child’s bottom as instructed.
  • Push it in far enough that it does not slip out again.
  • Ask your child to close their legs and hold your child’s buttocks together for a few minutes.
  • Wash your hands again.

If your child needs a second suppository, wait until the first has dissolved before inserting the second.”

I will add that for younger children such as babies in nappies I would advise that you place them on their backs and proceed to change their nappy – when you have the dirty nappy off and area wiped clean I would hold their legs back gently towards them with their knees bent and insert the suppository then and continue with the nappy change as normal.

cropped-websitefeetlogo.pngSome Useful Hints

  • If the suppository is warm before you open it you can run the wrapper under a cold tap or place it in a fridge for a few minutes to cool it as it can not be inserted when melted.
  • Being calm and confident will help your child to feel calm and confident in your actions.
  • If your child will take oral medicine and finds the use of suppositories distressing then do not persist – just offer oral medicine when necessary.
  • If you would like some tips on how to give your child oral medication then just click here!
  • Having a book ready so that you can scoop your child into your arms and settle them on your knee to read a story which will help them sit still to allow the suppository to absorb.
  • You should always consider the psychological welfare of your child and explain everything that you are doing – I even do it with babies even though they may have no idea what I’m talking about so that they get used to you respecting their personal space from an early age.
  • Sometimes the advice I have to give can make the process sound scarier than it really is – I assure you – babies in nappies most often are quite happy for you to administer a suppository and it can be such a great means to reduce a temperature that you may otherwise struggle to.

 

doctor-logo-red-white-mdWho should not use suppositories?

  • Children who have had bowel surgery unless prescribed by a doctor
  • Children who have an oncological condition or are otherwise immunocompromised.
  • Children who have irritable bowel disease.

 

websitefeetlogoI hope you found this information helpful and as always don’t hesitate to contact me on the WonderBaba Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) with any questions or for one to one advice for your little one! You can also consult with me in person at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 or over the phone on 012600262.

 

References:

 

 


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A WonderBaba Guide to Flat Head Syndrome!

 

IMG_7589In the early 1990s advice was issued for parents to place their babies to sleep only on their backs.  This recommendation was introduced by the American Academy of Pediatrics as babies who sleep on their backs have been proven to be less likely to die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.  I’ll write another article explaining all about SIDS soon but  it’s just important to highlight why we are correctly advised to place babies to sleep on their backs when we are discussing flat head syndrome.

Flat head syndrome is quite common, it affects approximately one in five babies. It describes the development of a flattened area on a babies head. There are two main types known as plagiocephaly and brachycephaly. Plagiocephaly is when the side of your babies head is effected and it can impact the alignment of a babies ears.  Brachycephaly is when the back of your babies head is affected and becomes flattened.  This can cause your babies head to appear wider also. Continue reading


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12 simple tips to protect your child from pollen!

Spring and summer can be a little frustrating because you want to encourage you child to be out doors but every time you do they are struck down by hay fever! Hay fever is more common in older children than babies with more boys being affected than girls interestingly.  To read my full blog on hay fever and its medical treatment you can click here or if you just want some top tips to help to avoid pollen then keep reading!

If you suspect hay fever the best thing to do is to limit your child’s exposure to the allergen pollen. This sounds simple, but once children are involved is anything actually easy?! Here’s some top tips to get you started!

  • met.ie-logo (2)Keep your child inside if the pollen count is above 50 or high.  To check the pollen count on any given day you can look up the MET Éireann website – http://www.met.ie/forecasts/pollen.asp
  • Let your child wear wrap-around sunglasses to stop the pollen from contacting their eyes.
  • Keep windows closed on days of a high pollen count. This one is hard because it’s often quite warm on these days but needs must!
  • Don’t hang your child’s clothes or bedding outside to dry as they may become covered in pollen which will cause irritation at night or during the day.
  • Don’t keep fresh flowers in the house (a good excuse for the men not to buy any!!)
  • Hoover regularly.
  • Dust with a damp cloth regularly.
  • If outdoors avoid areas where grass is being cut or has recently been cut.
  • Keep car windows closed when driving.
  • recirculated-airIf using the air conditioning in your car set it to re-circulate the air in the car instead of drawing in new air which may be heavy with pollen.
  • The best time to play outside is after a heavy down pour of rain – Irish weather comes in handy here! This is when the pollen count will be at its lowest.
  • Wash your child’s hands and face once you’ve finished playing outside to remove the pollen. Also change their clothes.

If you cannot get your child’s hay fever under control please do talk to me, your local Pharmacist or your GP.  Further information on the medical treatment of hay fever is available here!

cropped-websitefeetlogo.pngI hope you have found this article helpful and if you have any questions at all please don’t hesitate to contact me by sending a private message to the WonderBaba facebook page (www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) or by calling me (Sheena) at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 on 012600262. I’m always happy to help!


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WonderReview – Mustela 123 Vitamin Barrier Cream

first 40 yearsAfter three children and five and a half years of continuous nappy changing its fair to say as a Pharmacist I have had a vested interest in trying out all of the many many nappy rash creams that are available on the Irish market!  I’ve had phases with little or no nappy rash to battle and phases where it has felt impossible to clear! For the last couple of months I have unfortunately been battling a particularly persistent case so I was excited and eager to try the new Mustela 123 Vitamin Barrier Cream which arrived on our shelves in Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy…yes I am that sad – this is exactly the kind of thing that makes my day at the moment!! Continue reading


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Is this heat rash?

heat rash wonderbabaHeat rash is also known as miliaria or prickly heat.  There’s a few different kinds and the rash can range from mild small pimples to deep red lumps.  Its generally a pink or red rash which can be made up of dots, spots or pimples – most often these affect the head neck and shoulders.  Heat rash occurs when your baby’s sweat glands become blocked and become swollen, itchy and generally uncomfortable! It often occurs under clothes where the heat is worst and the material rubs off it causing further irritation and friction. Continue reading


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Should you give your baby calpol or nurofen before vaccinations?

This is a question that crops up time and time again – especially now since new guidance has been given with the introduction of the MenB Vaccine to the primary immunisation schedule.  I’d like to clear it up to help parents understand when you should or should not give your baby calpol or nurofen as a preventative strategy before vaccinations.

  • Ibuprofen (Nurofen) should not be given to prevent pain or fever before any vaccination on the childhood schedule.
  • Paracetamol (Calpol or Paralink) should only be given as a preventative measure at the time of the MenB vaccines only.  This recommendation applies only to the vaccines given at two and four months of age.
  • Paracetamol is recommended before the two and four month vaccines only as a result of the introduction of the MenB vaccine which may put your child at a higher risk of fever when given with the other vaccines.
  • At your child’s two or four month vaccines three doses of paracetamol should be given – the first dose of 2.5mls infant paracetamol (60mg) should be given at the time of vaccination or just after.  The second dose should be given 4-6 hours later and then the third dose should be given 4-6 hours after the second.
  • Paracetamol (calpol) does not need to be given routinely at the 12 month vaccines as your baby is less susceptible to the side effects of the MenB vaccination.

So basically other than before the two and four month vaccines you should not routinely try to prevent side effects of vaccines by giving medication.

However, it is important to stress that if your child is over six months of age and develops a fever over 39 degrees celcius or pain, swelling, headache or irritability after receiving a vaccine you can then use either paracetamol (calpol or paralink) or ibuprofen (nurofen) to treat their symptoms.

hugsOn a personal note I would recommend breastfeeding or if not bottle feeding your baby during or just after their vaccinations – and LOTS AND LOTS of cuddles and hugs…they are shocked and horrified by whats going on and a little love and reassurance is sometimes the best medicine!

cropped-websitefeetlogo.pngI hope you have found this article helpful and if you have any questions at all please don’t hesitate to contact me by sending a private message to the WonderBaba facebook page (www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) or by calling me (Sheena) at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 on 012600262. I’m always happy to help!

 

References

http://www.hse.ie/eng/health/immunisation/hcpinfo/guidelines/

PSI Guidance 2017

 


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Antihistamines – A WonderBaba Guide!

Here is a little guide with everything you need to know about antihistamines!

Antihistamines are medicines that treat allergic conditions. They work by relieving symptoms rather than curing conditions.  They treat symptoms like itching, rash, hives, hay fever, runny eyes or nose due to allergy, irritation from bites or stings or even food allergies.

An oral antihistamine solution may be used if your child is over two years of age. Continue reading


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A Wonder Review Ear Band-Its!

There is nothing worse than trying to explain to a child that they can’t go swimming  or mess too much in the bath because they are not allowed to get water in their ears due to grommets or ear perforation due to a bad infection.  In addition to that consider the nightmare which exists when trying to bathe a child who hates to have water in their ears!  From both a parents and child perspective ensuring no water enters the ear canal is nothing short of a disaster!

From my experience there are two main situations which arise! One where a child is not allowed to get water in their ears for medical reasons such as infection or grommets and another where a healthy child hates the feeling of water in their ears and suggesting a bath makes you enemy number one!! In essence it involves a parent trying to explain or battle (let’s be honest here!) with a child who either wants to splash and dunk their head under the water or else coaxing and convincing a child that hates the bath that water in their ears is ok and there is no need to be afraid!  Well I don’t know about your WonderBaba’s but mine certainly seem to follow my logical arguments!!

I recently came across a genius little product which solves the problems associated with both of these ‘water’ issues!  May I introduce… Ear Band-Its! Continue reading