WonderBaba

Healthcare by a Pharmacist mum!


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Is this heat rash?

heat rash wonderbabaHeat rash is also known as miliaria or prickly heat.  There’s a few different kinds and the rash can range from mild small pimples to deep red lumps.  Its generally a pink or red rash which can be made up of dots, spots or pimples – most often these affect the head neck and shoulders.  Heat rash occurs when your baby’s sweat glands become blocked and become swollen, itchy and generally uncomfortable! It often occurs under clothes where the heat is worst and the material rubs off it causing further irritation and friction. Continue reading


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Antihistamines – A WonderBaba Guide!

Here is a little guide with everything you need to know about antihistamines!

Antihistamines are medicines that treat allergic conditions. They work by relieving symptoms rather than curing conditions.  They treat symptoms like itching, rash, hives, hay fever, runny eyes or nose due to allergy, irritation from bites or stings or even food allergies.

An oral antihistamine solution may be used if your child is over two years of age. Continue reading


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Measles – A WonderBaba Guide!

Baby was receiving his scheduled vaccine injection in his left tMeasles is a contagious viral illness which is most common among children age one to four years of age.  The MMR vaccine is the most effective way to protect your child against measles and due to its success Ireland has a very low level of measles cases.  However in recent years controversy surrounding the vaccine which included an association with autism has resulted in some parents choosing not to vaccinate their children.  The World Health Organisation state that ‘no evidence exists of a causal association between MMR vaccine and autism or autistic disorders’.  In addition the HSE website shows a quote from Autism Speaks (2015), the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organisation has stated, “Over the last two decades, extensive research has asked whether there is any link between childhood vaccinations and autism. The results of this research are clear: Vaccines do not cause autism. We urge that all children be fully vaccinated”

The inaccurate link between autism and the MMR first came about in the late 1990’s and the children who were not vaccinated then would now be approximately 18 years of age….it seems no surprise to me that the current outbreak of measles in Ireland is affecting the 15-19 year age group mostly. The majority of the recent cases of measles were in patients who had not been vaccinated with the MMR.

The MMR vaccine should be given when your child is 12 months of age as a part of the childhood vaccination schedule and then a second dose is given when they are 4-5 years of age.  To read my blog all about the childhood vaccination schedule just click here!

Once you have had the vaccine or the virus it is very rare for you to get the infection as your body will then be immune and resistant to the virus.

 

What are the symptoms of the Measles?

  • Cold like symptoms including runny nose, sneezing, dry cough and sore eyes.
  • A mild to severe temperature which may last for several days.
  • Small white/grey spots in the mouth and throat.
  • Lack of energy and fatigue.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • measles rashA red-brown spotty rash which appears two to four days after the initial symptoms occur.  The rash can last for up to eight days and usually starts at the top of the head and works its way down the body.

It can be hard to differentiate measles rash from some other childhood rashes but the measles rash often starts as small spots which quickly get bigger and then join together.  Measles is not just defined by its rash but also by the symptoms that accompany it so if your child has a rash which sounds like this you should phone your GP to discuss it and arrange to visit at a time that other vulnerable patients will not be in the waiting room.

 

How is the measles virus spread?

WONDERBABA COUGHThe measles virus is spread by coughing and sneezing as it is present in the tiny water particles which are expelled by an infected person. If an infected person coughs or sneezes in close proximity to you, or you touch something which they have coughed or sneezed on, you may ingest the virus and thus become infected.  The measles virus can survive on surfaces for a couple of hours.  Symptoms of the measles start to appear about ten days after you have caught the infection.  You are contagious and can spread the virus from two to four days before the rash appears to about five days after.

How do I treat the measles?

The treatment of the measles simply involves the treatment of the symptoms.  The virus itself is self-limiting and will normally clear by itself within a couple of weeks.  To read my blog on managing a high temperature click here!

  • Paracetamol (calpol) or ibuprofen (nurofen) can be given in the case of a high temperature, aches or pains.
  • Soothe irritated eyes by cleansing with gauze dipped in boiled cooled water.  Use one piece of gauze as a single wipe from the inside of the eye outwards and then dispose of it.
  • To learn more about the treatment of coughs and what cough bottle can be used click here!
  • Ensure your child stays hydrated.  Tips on how to spot dehydration and how to prevent it can be found by clicking here!

doctor-logo-red-white-mdWhen to contact the doctor?

  • If measles is suspected phone your GP.
  • If you cannot alleviate the symptoms of measles using over the counter remedies.
  • If complications occur such as croup, bronchitis, a squint of the eye, ear ache, febrile convulsions, symptoms of meningitis, drowsiness, severe headache and vomiting.

 

websitefeetlogoI hope you have found this article helpful and if you have any questions at all please don’t hesitate to contact me by sending a private message to the WonderBaba facebook page (www.facebook.com/wonderbabacare) or by calling me (Sheena) at Milltown totalhealth Pharmacy in Dublin 6 on 012600262.  I’m always happy to help

 

References:

http://www.who.int/vaccine_safety/topics/mmr/mmr_autism/en/

http://www.hse.ie/eng/services/news/media/pressrel/furthermeasles.html

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/measles/Pages/Introduction.aspx

https://www.hpsc.ie/A-Z/VaccinePreventable/Measles/Publications/MeaslesPublicationsArchive/File,938,en.pdf

 


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A WonderBaba Guide – The Reality of Ringworm

Ringworm is also known as tinea corporis. Surprisingly it has absolutely nothing to do with worms at all, despite its name.  It is a common fungal infection which often affects children but can affect adults too and it is thought that 10-20% of people will suffer from ringworm at some stage in their lives! It is a highly contagious infection which can be passed from human to human and even from dog or cat to human.   It usually affects the arms or legs but can occur almost anywhere.

ringworm-wonderbabaWhat does it look like?

  • Affects arms and legs most frequently
  • Round, red or silvery patches of skin which can be scaly
  • The skin can be itchy and inflamed.

 

How do I prevent it? Continue reading


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Does your child have an allergy or medical condition? This will help!

Keeping your child safe from their allergy or highlighting their medical condition can be a challenge.. here’s a solution!Allermates-GRP-Stack-bands

Having a child with an allergy or medical condition comes with a whole array of worries for Mums and Dads.  As someone who grew up with a bad dairy allergy I can completely empathise with how hard it is to protect your child from the one thing (or many things!) which they can’t have and also how hard it is to ensure the  people who are involved in your child’s life understand and remember the importance of your child’s medical need.   I came across a product range recently in the pharmacy which struck me as incredibly useful and helpful in this instance and so wanted to share it with you in the hope your little one will suffer less as a result! Continue reading


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A WonderBaba guide to wasp and bee stings!

Summer and early Autumn are the most common times for wasps and bees to sting.  Bee and wasps stings are common in children as they are more likely to try to touch or catch them as they see them and think cute and funny!  Bee movie has a lot to answer for 😉 When a wasp stings it does not leave its stinger behind – but it does leave behind a small dose of its venom and can sting a number of times. Wasps are more aggressive than bees. Continue reading


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Nappy rash – causes and cures!

Nappy rash – causes and cures!
Nappy rash is a common skin condition which affects most children to some extent at some stage during their first year or two. It generally is caused by urine or poo being in contact with the babies skin and causing irritation, but can be as a result of other factors like antibiotic use, a change in diet such as from breast milk to formula, teething or chemical irritants. Continue reading